The Llama Project

DasLandRoverMan
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The Llama Project

Postby DasLandRoverMan » Sat Nov 10, 2012 9:30 am

The Llama project was Land Rovers answer to an MOD requirement to replace the 101, issued somewhere around 1984.

The first prototype was built up on a chassis following the same rough pattern as the 110 in heavier steel, with additions and modifications to carry the cab and rear body.
Mechanicals consisted of Salisbury axles front and rear (in the standard 110 track) with a carburettor V8 engine, along with an LT85/LT230 combination to transmit the power.
The cab was a box section assembly clad in GRP panels.
A look at photos of all the prototype vehicles shows various areas of the BL parts bin were raided, including DAF truck door handles, with a combination of Land/Range Rover instruments and switchgear with the Maestro and Montego also donating parts to the cause, a comfortable cab being a requirement for the civilian market, at which the truck was also planned to be aimed.

Initial testing of the prototype highlighted flaws in the design, including overall stability.
An increase of 12 inches in the vehicles track was a simple solution to the stability issue, however, a clean sheet design for the chassis was adopted for the second, and subsequent prototypes.

Testing of the revised vehicles was considered promising with the V8 engine and manual gearbox, and Land Rover were confident of their winning the contract, and were also looking into developing the vehicle for production and targeting civilian sales.
This included development of production tooling and one 'prototype' vehicle being assembled on the production line, whilst there were also comparison trials with the Toyota Dyna, Nissan Cabstar and Mitsubishi Fuso.

However, civilian marketing relied very much on an MOD contract to back up sales and production.
The major stumbling block was the tendered requirement for a Diesel engine, and an option for automatic transmission.
A vehicle was built with the 2.5 litre Turbo engine, (the most powerful Land Rover diesel engine available at the time) and submitted for trials, performance was unsurprisingly deemed unacceptable for a fully laden vehicle with a 1,750kg payload.

As trials with competing vehicles continued the Llama team were looking at other options available to them, with the idea of utilising a 4 cylinder Perkins Phaser engine coupled to a Chrysler TF727 automatic gearbox in a trials vehicle to provide the preferred diesel automatic option, and acceptable performance.
The project was however cancelled before further development could take place.
The MOD were leaning toward the RB44 as the replacement for the 101, despite the Llama being a technically superior and more capable vehicle, in part due to the RB44 being offered with the Perkins Phaser engine, although some suggestion of the decision makers being given 'financial incentive' to grant the contract to the RB44 have also circulated.

As the MOD contract looked to be escaping from their grasp, and the restriction of funding for the Land Rover company as a complete entity Tony Gilroy (then MD of the company) pulled the plug on the project as projected civilian/utility sales of Llamas wouldn't have been viable on their own, and what money was available was being directed to 'Project Jay' now known as the original Discovery.
The Llama project was put to pasture in the first half of 1988, ten complete vehicles survived and were put to work in various roles around the factory, in grounds maintainence and for use in testing other new models.
A large number of spare parts were also retained and are now kept by Dunsfold Land Rover, whilst vehicles numbered 1, 2, 4, 5 and 10 reside in the dunsfold collection.
The Sole production vehicle is on display at the Gaydon museum, with others owned by private collectors.
Another was assembled from parts in 1998 for a private owner by Stuart and Adrian Hibbard, and was SVA tested and road registered. It now carries the reg number G 11 AMA.

Land Rover produced a specification for 'Truck Utility Heavy 4x4 Land Rover Llama 8 Cylinder Petrol' vehicles which is available for download, and does make interesting reading, worth noting references to a Diesel engine and automatic gearbox.

It's around 66Mb, so it will take a while to download...

http://web2.muddyweb.com/Llama.pdf
Westlakes All Wheel Drive

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DasLandRoverMan
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Re: The Llama Project

Postby DasLandRoverMan » Fri Aug 01, 2014 7:37 pm

In reference to the 'incentives' for the RB44 being accepted as the 101 replacement over the Llama, I have recently heard the following:

Apparently the MOD wished to use the Reynolds Boughton 'DROPS' system (some form of quick release tilt and slide loading mechanism for heavy trucks) but didn't want to use Reynolds Boughton vehicles in the role.
In order to pacify Reynolds Boughton Engineering they were offered the contract for the RB44 if they would agree to use of the DROPS system on another manufacturers trucks.

What truth there is to this I'm unsure, but it certainly.sounds plausible.
Westlakes All Wheel Drive

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Wheeledbeast
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Re: The Llama Project

Postby Wheeledbeast » Sat Aug 02, 2014 9:33 am

Image 8-)

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parksy64
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Re: The Llama Project

Postby parksy64 » Sat Aug 02, 2014 1:37 pm

And I've driven it :DD

DasLandRoverMan
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Posts: 1284
Joined: Sat Oct 20, 2012 9:33 am
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Re: The Llama Project

Postby DasLandRoverMan » Sat Dec 08, 2018 3:33 pm

DasLandRoverMan wrote:
Sat Nov 10, 2012 9:30 am
The Llama project was Land Rovers answer to an MOD requirement to replace the 101, issued somewhere around 1984.

The first prototype was built up on a chassis following the same rough pattern as the 110 in heavier steel, with additions and modifications to carry the cab and rear body.
Mechanicals consisted of Salisbury axles front and rear (in the standard 110 track) with a carburettor V8 engine, along with an LT85/LT230 combination to transmit the power.
The cab was a box section assembly clad in GRP panels.
A look at photos of all the prototype vehicles shows various areas of the BL parts bin were raided, including DAF truck door handles, with a combination of Land/Range Rover instruments and switchgear with the Maestro and Montego also donating parts to the cause, a comfortable cab being a requirement for the civilian market, at which the truck was also planned to be aimed.

Initial testing of the prototype highlighted flaws in the design, including overall stability.
An increase of 12 inches in the vehicles track was a simple solution to the stability issue, however, a clean sheet design for the chassis was adopted for the second, and subsequent prototypes.

Testing of the revised vehicles was considered promising with the V8 engine and manual gearbox, and Land Rover were confident of their winning the contract, and were also looking into developing the vehicle for production and targeting civilian sales.
This included development of production tooling and one 'prototype' vehicle being assembled on the production line, whilst there were also comparison trials with the Toyota Dyna, Nissan Cabstar and Mitsubishi Fuso.

However, civilian marketing relied very much on an MOD contract to back up sales and production.
The major stumbling block was the tendered requirement for a Diesel engine, and an option for automatic transmission.
A vehicle was built with the 2.5 litre Turbo engine, (the most powerful Land Rover diesel engine available at the time) and submitted for trials, performance was unsurprisingly deemed unacceptable for a fully laden vehicle with a 1,750kg payload.

As trials with competing vehicles continued the Llama team were looking at other options available to them, with the idea of utilising a 4 cylinder Perkins Phaser engine coupled to a Chrysler TF727 automatic gearbox in a trials vehicle to provide the preferred diesel automatic option, and acceptable performance.
The project was however cancelled before further development could take place.
The MOD were leaning toward the RB44 as the replacement for the 101, despite the Llama being a technically superior and more capable vehicle, in part due to the RB44 being offered with the Perkins Phaser engine, although some suggestion of the decision makers being given 'financial incentive' to grant the contract to the RB44 have also circulated.

As the MOD contract looked to be escaping from their grasp, and the restriction of funding for the Land Rover company as a complete entity Tony Gilroy (then MD of the company) pulled the plug on the project as projected civilian/utility sales of Llamas wouldn't have been viable on their own, and what money was available was being directed to 'Project Jay' now known as the original Discovery.
The Llama project was put to pasture in the first half of 1988, ten complete vehicles survived and were put to work in various roles around the factory, in grounds maintainence and for use in testing other new models.
A large number of spare parts were also retained and are now kept by Dunsfold Land Rover, whilst vehicles numbered 1, 2, 4, 5 and 10 reside in the dunsfold collection.
The Sole production vehicle is on display at the Gaydon museum, with others owned by private collectors.
Another was assembled from parts in 1998 for a private owner by Stuart and Adrian Hibbard, and was SVA tested and road registered. It now carries the reg number W 11 AMA.

Land Rover produced a specification for 'Truck Utility Heavy 4x4 Land Rover Llama 8 Cylinder Petrol' vehicles which is available for download, and does make interesting reading, worth noting references to a Diesel engine and automatic gearbox.

It's around 66Mb, so it will take a while to download...

http://web2.muddyweb.com/Llama.pdf
Westlakes All Wheel Drive

Carpe Dentum - Sieze the Teeth!!!


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